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Sarad Paudel's One Health Institute Fellowship

Sarad developed a matrix of infectious diseases in sensitive wildlife in Nepal and, in the One Health Institute lab, received training in detection and diagnosis of emerging and re-emerging diseases from humans, non-human primates and rodents around the world.

Sarad Paudel is a PhD student at the the Laboratory of Wildlife Biology and Medicine at the Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine at Hokkaido University in Japan. He was selected by Japan's Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) under the International Priority Graduate Programs (PGP) to get his PhD at Hokkaido University. He is studying tuberculosis in Nepalese elephants for his thesis research. 

Hokkaido University's Leading Program at the Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine arranged for Sarad to spend one month as a fellow at the UC Davis One Health Institute for his internship training from May 13 to June 12. While at UC Davis, he was under the supervision of Professor Jonna Mazet, Director of One Health Institute. He participated in a wide variety of activities aimed at giving him a multi-faceted experience and fostering his career as a global leader in veterinary science and One Health. 

Sarad (center) and the OHI lab team. 

During his time at the OHI, Sarad came to value the input and needs of stakeholders at UC Davis and abroad. During his brief training, he was actively involved in global wildlife and human health projects and learned the techniques employed at the OHI to manage projects and investigate disease threats. 

During just one month, he developed a matrix of infectious diseases in sensitive wildlife in Nepal and, in the OHI lab, received training in detection and diagnosis of emerging and re-emerging diseases from humans, non-human primates and rodents around the world. His work on the development of the matrix of infectious diseases in endangered species of wildlife in Nepal will be used to help identify and prioritize response and training plans for infectious diseases that may emerge in these species.

Sarad and Dr. Jonna Mazet, Director of the One Health Institute. 

Sarad joined other activities of the Karen C. Drayer Wildlife Health Center at OHI as well. He visited and gained knowledge on the activities at the California Raptor Center, Students for One Health clinic for underserved minorities, and the Sacramento Zoo, which is collaborating with the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine on the residency program in zoological medicine. Sarad also joined seminars and presentations at OHI during his training here.

Sarad will have great potential as an academic researcher or scientist in his career, particularly in fields that specialize in infectious diseases transmitted at the interface of humans, domestic animals, wildlife, and environment.


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When They Were Students

The photos below are of One Health Institute faculty members. The photos were taken back when they were students accumulating the knowledge and skills that prepared them for the important work they do today. 

Woutrina Smith

“They had said it was too hard to build a career in wildlife so I trained up in small animal and exotics in vet school. Then I realized people had also told me it was too hard to go to vet school so I should just go to med school. Well, someone’s got to do all these things… why not us?”

Woutrina, Associate Professor of Epidemiology


Kirsten Gilardi

"The summer right after graduation from veterinary school (more than 20 years ago - yikes!), I spent 6 weeks in the Peruvian Amazon with my husband Jamie, surveying wild parrot species for viruses known to infect captive birds. The project was the culmination of a lot of mentoring and support I received while I was a veterinary student, especially from Walter Boyce, Linda Lowenstine, and Murray Fowler.

In this sunrise photo, it's the end of the season and we're starting our boat trip back down the Manu River from our field camp, heading home to Davis to start a residency in Primate Medicine. So the smile is for a lot of things: excitement about embarking on next steps as a brand-new (wildlife!) veterinarian, but mostly about the prospect of a hot shower and a cold beer."

— Kirsten, Co-Director of the Karen C. Drayer Wildlife Health Center


Jonna Mazet

"After working in a small animal clinic throughout high school, I knew I wanted to be a veterinarian, but I also wanted to apply what I was learning in a broader way. Luckily, I was able to get involved in research in my early years of veterinary school, which exposed me to what our profession could contribute to wildlife and the world. Little did I know that I was working with and meeting people with whom I would continue to partner throughout my career. Check out Walter Boyce (on the right) in his first faculty lab; he and I would later become Co-Directors of the Wildlife Health Center for 15 years!"

Jonna, Director of the UC Davis One Health Institute


Mike Ziccardi

"While at UCD for vet school, I was fortunate enough to have some exceptional mentors to help me pursue my career path in free-ranging wildlife medicine. Dave Jessup at that time was with the Department of Fish and Game's Wildlife Investigations Lab, and helped foster my interests by allowing me to tag along during some of their many different activities, including net-gun captures of bighorn sheep out of helicopters in Southern California. These experiences not only helped me to (eventually) become a wildlife veterinarian, but they showed me the power of taking the time and energy to foster and encourage interested and energetic students with a passion for wildlife; efforts we continue to promote here at the Karen C. Drayer Wildlife Health Center!"

Mike, Co-Director of the Karen C. Drayer Wildlife Health Center


Tracey Goldstein

“Just another day in the office... Working with wildlife and studying their diseases can bring us to many diverse locales. How lucky are we? But don't underestimate that discipline, long days and rigor are needed to do this kind of work.”

Tracey, Lab Director, Associate Director of the UC Davis One Health Institute


Christine Johnson

"Veterinary school was a last minute career decision for me, as I was headed to medical school like all of the other students interested in science at my undergraduate school. In fact pre-vet career counseling was not even an option at my school, only pre-med. I can honestly say that since that decision, there’s never been a dull moment, which has made this an absolutely perfect career." 

Christine, Associate Director of the UC Davis One Health Institute

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